It’s a God Thing!

Many Christians refer to, “It’s a God thing” to explain the obvious response from God. Non-Christians don’t understand, but Christians who have experienced it understand completely.

Over the years, I have kept a record of, “God things” that I have personally experienced. I find comfort in reading over His responses when I occasionally question if He hears me. I had such an obvious God thing happen just yesterday that I felt compelled to write about it.

Yesterday morning, my husband and I were having breakfast. A question had been in the back of my mind for several days. I boldly asked him, “When God created the garden of Eden, it was perfect. So why would God have allowed Satan even to enter the garden?” My husband looked thoughtful for a moment and commented that maybe because God gave us free will. The serpent had to be there to add contrast. As good of an answer as any, I reluctantly accepted that mindful response.

I woke at 1:15 am the next morning and decided to turn on the telecross_jesus_wood_216556vision and watch whatever might be on Trinity Broadcast Network. Pastor John Gray sermon was on dominion, a word I honestly wasn’t sure the meaning. The next question he posed was, “Have you ever wondered why God would have allowed the serpent into the garden of Eden?” I screamed out to the television, “YES!” God was going to answer my question from this morning’s previous conversation. I quickly grabbed my notepad and pen from my nightstand expecting to take some sophisticated and enlighten notes. Here is what Pastor John Gray said, “Satan had to be there because God gave us free will, dominion.” He then proceeded to read from Ezekiel 28:16-17

“Your rich commerce led you to violence, and you sinned. So I banished you in disgrace from the mountain of God. I expelled you. O mighty guardian, from your place among the stones of fire. Your heart was filled with pride because of all your beauty. Your wisdom was corrupted by your love of splendor. So I threw you to the ground and exposed you to the curious gaze of kings.”

I sat on my bed in amazement that the great God Almighty, the king of kings and creator of everything would have taken the time to answer my question in such an obvious fashion. It’s a God thing. As I continue to grow my blog and set forth on my mission, I will have a special section entitled “It’s a God Thing” to record actual happenings that are recognizable God things. Thank you Lord for answering my question. It’s so reassuring to know that you’re always listening. Amen.

 

Holiday Blues

It’s that time again. The holidays are upon us. We are beinfamily dinnerg bombarded with commercials to buy new cars, perfume, alcohol, the list goes on.  Advertisers are also guilty of showing happy families sitting down for the holiday meal, each nicely dressed and chatting politely.  You can almost smell the heavenly food as they politely pass around each dish. I have lived through 57 Thanksgivings and Christmases.  Through the years I have spent them with my immediate family, friend’s family, boyfriend’s family, husband’s family, my sister’s family, total strangers on a cruise ship, and completely alone. As we age, the families grow and begin to divide. For those who never had children, holidays become more difficult once our parents pass on and other family members move away or become more distant.  Lively neighborhoods bustle with the sounds of family and friends gathering across the street for the celebration we long for with our loved ones.

It has been a myth that suicide rates tend to increase during the holiday season. Yet, according to the National Institute of Health, Christmas is the time of year that people experience a high incidence of depression. High expectations, money woes, and other holiday hazards can spell trouble for those prone to depression.  every where  you turn, you’re being told  how much you should be enjoying this time of year.  You know you should be happy and having fun, but it just isn’t happening.

I remember the first Christmas after my mother had passed away. I was only 24 years old, single and no children.  I had an older sister that had three boys living in the same town. That fall, I enrolled in a college class that dealt with holiday depression. I knew it was going to be difficult so I was trying to be pro-active in planning.  One of the many things suggested was to plan a vacation.  Go some place different.  Being as how I lived in the pacific northwest, Christmas season was always cold, wet and dreary. I opted for a cruise to the Bahamas.  I worked a second job for eight months just so I could pay for it.  I had a wonderful time.  It didn’t feel like Christmas day as I laid on the warm white sand with the sound of the ocean  and gulls flying above.  For four days I was able to escape the traditional holiday and enjoy my first Christmas without family and minimal depression.

As a Christian and an older adult, Christmas means something totally different to me than it once did.  I no longer get caught up with all the reckless spending. My husband and I usually splurge and go to a nice restaurant for dinner and then enjoy a quiet evening watching holiday movies.  We appreciate the fact we don’t have to deal with family bickering and their Olympics, annoying discussions and tired, unruly children.  We celebrate the birth of our Lord and give thanks to Him. What is truly delightful is that when January rolls around,  our budget still looks the same as the month before.

The Moon and God

What was the first liquid and food consumed on the moon? I’m betting that most are unaware of this story.Forty-five years ago, two human beings changed history by walking on the surface of the moon. But, what happened before Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong exited the Lunar Module is perhaps even more amazing, if only because so few people know about it. I’m talking about the fact that Buzz Aldrin took communion on the surface of the moon. Some months after his return, he wrote about it in Guideposts magazine.  The background to the story is that Aldrin was an elder at his Presbyterian Church in Texas during this period in his life;  and, knowing that he would soon be doing something unprecedented in human history,  he felt that he should mark the occasion somehow.  He asked his minister to help him and so the minister consecrated a communion wafer and a small vial of communion wine.  Buzz Aldrin took them with him out of the Earth’s orbit and onto the surface of the moon.  He and Armstrong had only been on the lunar surface for a few minutes when Aldrin made the following public statement:  This is the LM (Lunar Module) pilot. I’d like to take this opportunity to ask every person listening in,  whoever and wherever they may be, to pause for a moment and contemplate the events of the past few hours and to give thanks in his or her own way. He then ended radio communication, and there, on the silent surface of the moon, 250,000 miles from home, he read a verse from the Gospel of John, and he took communion. Here is his own account of what happened:     “In the radio blackout, I opened the little plastic packages which contained the bread and the wine.  I poured the wine into the chalice our church had given me. In the one-sixth gravity of the moon, the wine slowly curled and gracefully came up the side of the cup.  Then I read the scripture:   ‘I am the vine, you are the branches. Whosoever abides in me will bring forth much fruit … Apart from me you can do nothing.” I had intended to read my communion passage back to Earth, but at the last minute [they] had requested that I not do this.  NASA was already embroiled in a legal battle with Madelyn Murray O’Hare, the celebrated opponent of religion, over the Apollo 8 crew’s reading from Genesis while orbiting the moon at Christmas. I agreed reluctantly.”

“I ate the tiny toast and swallowed the wine. I gave thanks for the intelligence and spirit that had brought two young pilots to the Sea of Tranquility. It was interesting for me to think that the very first liquid ever poured on the moon and the very first food eaten there were the communion elements.”

“And, of course, it’s interesting to think that some of the first words spoken on the moon were the words of Jesus Christ,who made the Earth and the moon – and who, in the immortal words of Dante, is Himself the “Love that moves the Sun and other stars.” How many of you knew this? Too bad this type of news doesn’t travel as fast as the bad does. 

Share with others you know . . . . . . .

The nicest place to be is in someone’s thoughts, the safest place to be is in someone’s prayers, and the very best place to be is in the hands of God. Amen.